When I believe I can and am ready to learn, then I will learn

I am now ready to learn again and am taking another great open online course from Harvard University. Never in a million years did I believe that I would be able to even contemplate on going on a course at Harvard, but now it is possible with a Mooc, and it all sounds rather posh.

The course is called Leaders of Learning and is so far very interesting in defining what leadership looks like in different learning environments. At the moment as most of us know the education world is undergoing quite a big transformation and the “How we learn, what we learn, where we learn, and why we learn” is being tossed and turned into many different theories and models to follow. But what about the leadership roles that need to be defined during this transformation? I am hoping to find out.

We start the course by doing a learning assessment which categorises us into a certain learning type. Mine was a Distributed Collective Quadrant that is to say I learn when I want to learn, collaborate and join networks to learn, which is very true to my character.

One of the recommendations for us whilst reading through the course, was this book which is the first time I have come across it, it was written nearly 20 years ago but is still very now!

The Book of Learning and Forgetting

In his 1998 book, The Book of Learning and Forgetting, education professor Frank Smith argued that when learning is not enjoyable, it is a waste of effort, and that even the most well-intentioned teachers cannot force students to learn. He instead favoured a natural approach to learning, unbounded by traditional structures.

Learning is: continual, effortless, inconspicuous, boundless, unpremeditated, independent of rewards and punishment, based on self-image, vicarious, never forgotten, inhibited by testing, a social activity, [and] growth. (1998, p. 1-2)